Dry Eye Syndrome
Dry eye is a condition in which there are insufficient tears to lubricate and nourish the eye. ...
Presbyopia
Presbyopia is a vision condition in which the crystalline lens of your eye loses its flexibilit...
Amblyopia
Amblyopia, or "lazy eye," is the loss of one eye's ability to see details. It is the most commo...
Dry Eye Syndrome

Dry eye is a condition in which there are insufficient tears to lubricate and nourish the eye. Tears are necessary for maintaining the health of the front surface of the eye and for providing clear vision. People with dry eyes either do not produce enough tears or have a poor quality of tears. Dry eye is a common and often chronic problem, particularly in older adults.

With each blink of the eyelids, tears are spread across the front surface of the eye, known as the cornea. Tears provide lubrication, reduce the risk of eye infection, wash away foreign matter in the eye, and keep the surface of the eyes smooth and clear. Excess tears in the eyes flow into small drainage ducts, in the inner corners of the eyelids, which drain in the back of the nose.

Dry eyes can result from an improper balance of tear production and drainage.

People with dry eyes may experience symptoms of irritated, gritty, scratchy, or burning eyes, a feeling of something in their eyes, excess watering, and blurred vision. Advanced dry eyes may damage the front surface of the eye and impair vision.

Treatments for dry eyes aim to restore or maintain the normal amount of tears in the eye to minimize dryness and related discomfort and to maintain eye health.

Source: American Optometric Association

Enucleation of the eye

Enucleation is removal of the eye, leaving the eye muscles and remaining orbital contents intact. This type of ocular surgery is indicated for a number of different ocular tumors, in eyes that have suffered severe trauma, and in eyes that are blind and painful owing to other disease.

Source: Wikipedia

Electronic Eye Implant

Promising results have shown that blind patients have regained their sight with a sub-retinal microchip, according to the first part of the second clinical trial for the device taking place in Germany. The patients involved in the study, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, were blinded by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and used the implant in and outside of their homes. Retinitis pigmentosa is one of the most common types of inherited retinal degenerations and affects nearly 1.5 million people around the world. It is a progressive condition, becoming worse over time and causes severe vision problems as age progresses. Retinal implants provide hope for RP patients to regain their sight.

Source: Medical News Today.

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